Educator Competencies

Endorsed by Duke AHEAD Steering Committee, November 18, 2015 (Last updated 11/18/15)

Significance of this competency

Assessment and evaluation are critical components of educational practice. Often, faculty and learners alike focus more on instructional strategies than on measures to assess and evaluate learning; however, the former can be most effective only when the latter is done well.

Assessment is an ongoing and interactive process between learners and teachers, designed to collect data about student learning and performance and identify potential areas...

Endorsed by Duke AHEAD Steering Committee, November 18, 2015 (Last updated 11/18/15)

Significance         

The development and evaluation of educational curricula is at the heart of the teaching enterprise.  A curriculum is a complex interaction of many components and, at the same time, is bigger than the sum of all those parts.  It is founded upon a deliberate philosophy of education that is connected to the institution’s and profession’s mission and value, and it is constructed to help learners achieve complex, multi-faceted program outcomes. ...

Endorsed by Duke AHEAD Steering Committee, November 18, 2015 (Last updated 11/18/15)

Significance

Learners in the 21st century live in a world where technology touches every part of their lives, and the educational arena is no exception.  Educators use technology to facilitate and assess learning, stimulate thinking, expose learners to diverse perspectives on issues, and create community between and among learners and teachers.  Technology is a tool that can fascinate teachers and learners alike; however, health professions educators must always keep in mind that it...

Endorsed by Duke AHEAD Steering Committee, November 18, 2015 (Last updated 11/18/15)

Significance of this competency

We are all learners, and as educators, we learn when we teach and when we practice.  For decades, scholars have studied how people learn, ways to facilitate/enhance learning, the nature of positive learning environments, and ways to modify approaches to teaching in order to meet the unique needs of diverse learner populations and the variety of material to be learned.  Such scholarly efforts have led to the development and testing of many theories and...

Endorsed by Duke AHEAD Steering Committee, November 18, 2015 (Last updated 11/18/15)

Significance

Health professions educators recognize their responsibility for helping students develop an identity as a member of a particular professional community, including integration of the values and behaviors expected of members of that community.

The idea of formation refers to “the kind of education that leads to … what we often call character or integrity” (Walker et al, 2008, p. ix).  Formation occurs over time and denotes “a way of being and acting in practice and...

Endorsed by Duke AHEAD Steering Committee, November 18, 2015 (Last updated 11/18/15)

Significance          

Health professions educators demonstrate leadership and promote change at various levels: in the classroom, institution and profession, as well as among various educator groups. While educators also fulfill specific management roles, they can serve in a leadership capacity as well. Leadership is not limited to a few; it can be fulfilled by educators outside a defined management or authority role.

Leaders emerge from within a group because they express a...

Endorsed by Duke AHEAD Steering Committee, November 18, 2015 (Last updated 11/18/15)

Significance

Health professions educators are characterized by a deep value for lifelong learning, and they make a commitment to model and instill this value in learners and colleagues.  Lifelong learning is ongoing, voluntary, and self-motivated and as such, is an intrinsic component of one’s role as an educator. It involves identifying opportunities for improvement as an educator, developing and implementing a plan for continuous growth, engaging in formal and informal learning...

Endorsed by Duke AHEAD Steering Committee, November 18, 2015 (Last updated 11/18/15)

Significance

It is acknowledged that scholarship is an integral component of the health professions educator role and can come in many forms (Boyer 1990), that teaching practices should be evidence-based (just as clinical practices are), and that teaching itself can be thought of as a scholarly activity.  Scholarship incorporates a spirit of inquiry, self-reflection, and unrelenting inquisitiveness.

Scholars are continually curious, vigorously inquiring, impelled by a sense...